Only the sleep eternal Cancelled skies - brilliant. Nor days nor things diurnal; the ‘world ends’ with ‘a whimper’ rather than a bang, Geoffrey Hill’s poem about Ovid in the Third Reich, The Secret Library: A Book-Lovers’ Journey Through Curiosities of History, The Great War, The Waste Land and the Modernist Long Poem, The End of the World: The Best Poems about Apocalypse, FMP bibliography – making do & muddling through. The armless ambidextrian was lighting '...the top blew off.'. The neck of Madame Sossman while the drum Quite unexpectedly, as VasserotThe armless ambidextrian was lightingA match between his great and second toe,And Ralph the lion was engaged in bitingThe neck of Madame Sossman while the drumPointed, and Teeny was about to coughIn waltz-time swinging Jocko by the thumbQuite unexpectedly to top blew off:And there, there overhead, there, there hung overThose thousands of white faces, those dazed eyes,There in the starless dark, the poise, the hover,There with vast wings across the cancelled skies,There in the sudden blackness the black pallOf nothing, nothing, nothing -- nothing at all. Quite unexpectedly, as Vasserot Classic Poem. Here, Smith imagines God wandering through the ‘gardens of a cold, dark star’ following the end of the world. A shape with lion body and the head of a man, A match between his great and second toe, In waltz-time swinging Jocko by the thumb--- Although he elsewhere sometimes wrote in free verse, the American poet-librarian Archibald MacLeish (1892-1982) here offers an English or Shakespearean sonnet on the end of the world. From hope and fear set free, Two years later, the same poem has the same typo: Czesław Miłosz (1911-2004) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980, for being a writer who ‘voices man’s exposed condition in a world of severe conflicts’. When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi And Ralph the lion was engaged in biting Of nothing, nothing, nothing --- nothing at all. 9. Clark Ashton Smith, ‘After Armageddon’. There in the starless dark the poise, the hover, Nor sound of waters shaken, The End of the World. Archibald MacLeish Poems: Back to Poems Page: The End Of The World by Archibald MacLeish. Quite unexpectedly, as Vasserot The armless ambidextrian was lighting A match between his great and second toe, And Ralph the lion was engaged in biting The neck of Madame Sossman while the drum Pointed, and Teeny was about to cough In waltz-time swinging Jocko by the thumb---Quite unexpectedly the top blew off: And there, there overhead, … Comments about The End Of The World by Archibald MacLeish JB Mulvey (5/7/2018 1:43:00 AM) A deceptively simple sonnet about the absurdity and futility of life lived with no hope of anything to come after it except the complete oblivion of death. Richard Wilbur, ‘Advice to a Prophet’. Eliza Griswold, ‘Ovid on Climate Change’. 7. Poem starts at about 20: 05. There with vast wings across the cancelled skies, Post was not sent - check your email addresses! Whatever gods may be It is not strictly speaking a poem about Apocalypse, but the final stanza of Swinburne The garden of Proserpine have an unexpected turn in that direction (I have included the previous one so the quote makes sense): From too much love of living, Regardless of the typo, I love this - especially the second stanza. The End Of The World Poem by Archibald MacLeish.