It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed, LitCharts uses cookies to personalize our services. Actually, there’s no mention of the statue at all, and the poet simply describes its parts. (read the full definition & explanation with examples), British Library's "Introduction to Ozymandias". — This website shows the statue of Ramses II (Ozymandias), the discovery of which may have inspired Shelley's poem. — The Bodleian Library at Oxford University digitized and transcribed an early draft of "Ozymandias" from 1817 and made it available online. The description is about a statue which has been destroyed and the desert that surrounds it. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. What the poem is doing is describing a process of observation. — Shelley first published "Ozymandias" in The Examiner in 1818, under the name "Glirastes." The BBC explains why and embeds the trailer in the webpage. However, one survivor beside Ozymandias' words is the sculptor's skill: it is witnessed by the success of the statue in capturing 'those passions' of the king, even when partly ruined. This sense of solitude and desolation is also a sibilance, a projection of the sound of the wind. It’s a short poem, the meaning of which is implicit. It’s essentially ironic, specially in line 11, when Ozymandias says “Look on my works”, since there are no works. (including. Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, This is a scan of the first edition printing. 7Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things. — The Bodleian Library at Oxford University digitized and transcribed an early draft of "Ozymandias" from 1817 and made it available online. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Select any word below to get its definition in the context of the poem. . And on the pedestal these words appear — He’s an experiencer too, since he reads and understands the past of Ozymandias. The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed. The fact that the statue is fragmented and that the poet puts emphasis on its pieces suggests a sense of destruction. The opposition of “survive” and “lifeless” refers to the sculptor himself, who lives from creating art. Round the decay Among its parts, we find out that it’s trunkless, and a description of the lips, hands, etc. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. It’s an objective correlative, where the poem becomes a metaphor. Ambiguity: The sculptor ‘ mocked ’ Ramses II’s features. Near them, on the sand, Most of the time we find juxtapositions to describe different aspects of the scene. 12Nothing beside remains. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. He’s referring to an ancient civilisation. Who said. . Teachers and parents! Nothing beside remains. The title of “Ozymandias” refers to an alternate name of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II. There is also a sense of solitude, expressed by means of a desert, in the poem. 3Stand in the desert. Tell that its sculptor well those passions read The speaker in the poem is identified with a series of referents and their qualities or location. The lone and level sands stretch far away.”. Near them, on the sand. Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair! Literally, it’s a description, but figuratively it means something else. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal, these words appear: In lines 10-11, “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:/Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”, there is a feeling of sadness. — The British Library has a short introduction to "Ozymandias" that includes excerpts of potential sources for the poem, historical information about Ramses II (Ozymandias), as well as details about Shelley's radical politics. 2Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone. 4Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown. We have quite a lot of coordinations involved in the poem. 5And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, 6Tell that its sculptor well those passions read. He becomes an active agent by through making fun of his sculpting. Round the decay We find a quotation, in the form of direct speech, which are the words engraved on the stone. — The tv show Breaking Bad featured the poem "Ozymandias" in a trailer for the final season. Change ). Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, Have a specific question about this poem? In terms of role types, The only active agent in the poem is the sculptor. Breaking Bad and Ozymandias The poem is related to the transitory passing of time and the ephemerality of life: the inevitable disappearance of cities and the transitive nature of man and his creation; all human creation is something that will pass away and cease to exist, so human effort is in a sense pointless. Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, The tendency is to use the SVC (Subject + Verb + Complement) structure, and sometimes it’s followed by a relative clause. Line 7 is ambiguous: “Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things” . There are no action verbs because there is basically no action, just a series of descriptions. The expression on Ozymandias’ face (more on that later) is arrogant, but the alliteration of the harsh c sound adds another dimension to his character - he was a cruel and callous ruler. We can perceive tranquillity as well: art may remain, everything will pass and human effort is futile. . — This website shows the statue of Ramses II (Ozymandias), the discovery of which may have inspired Shelley's poem. — The tv show Breaking Bad featured the poem "Ozymandias" in a trailer for the final season. Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, He mocks Ozymandias by sculpting him (line 8). In this case, art is a form of criticism. It also shows that the sand has eroded the actual shape of the statue, representing the destructive power of time. However, the only thing that remains is just a statue, a broken piece of art, the work of the sculptor and nothing else, since Ozymandias’ words have disappeared. The poem itself creates a frame where the speaker introduces a character he has met and then the character speaks.