If you have old Mexican bank notes and want to know if they may have some value in collectors’ markets, visit a site like eBay to browse old Mexican bank notes that will help you to assess their current value. As one of the oldest currencies in North America, the original Mexican Peso followed the design of the Spanish silver dollar and eight-piece. Examples of present-day values (from Bank of Mexico information in links above): Stores won’t accept the old bank notes: If you have old bank notes you want to exchange for present-day notes, you need to take them to the Bank of Mexico or to any of one Mexico’s retail banks. The exchange limit at a retail bank is 500 notes or a present-day value of $3,000 pesos. Your complete guide to money in Mexico: for vacations and visits, business trips, living and retirement, Articles and Guides about Mexican Currency and Money. Mexico encountered two significant economic crises in recent decades: one in the early 1980s and another in the mid-1990s. or take MXN rates on the go with our XE Currency Apps and website. On January 1, 1993 Mexico re-based its currency by removing three zeros from all denominations and launched the New Peso. The value changed with 1,000 old Pesos becoming one Nuevo Peso. $50,000 peso notes were commonplace and in the early 90s, the Bank of Mexico issued a $100,000 peso bank note; at the time, these were worth about US$16.50 and US$33 respectively. Originally a stable and safe currency, it helped inspire the design of the American Dollar, which was released at par with the Mexican Peso. In the 1980s Mexico’s currency was denominated not in ones and tens, but in hundreds and thousands. The Bank of Mexico honors all genuine notes it issues, regardless of their date of emission, at present-day values. Collectors’ markets: A trade exists in collectors’ markets for historical bank notes, including old bank notes from Mexico. Learn more about Mexican money: For a detailed guide to Mexican currency and to discover Mexican bank notes in current circulation, see the Mexperience Guide to Money in Mexico. Old Mexican bank notes can be exchanged for their present-day value at the Bank of Mexico, or sold to collectors who seek to acquire them. In 1993, after several years of inflation and devaluation, the Bank of Mexico changed its monetary policies and introduced a new currency called the Nuevo Peso (New Peso). This article explains what these old Mexican bank notes are worth, and how you can exchange them, or sell them to collectors. Click on a currency code to learn about it. In 1996, the term 'Nuevo' was dropped, and it is now simply referred to as the Mexican Peso (MXN). Examples of present-day values (from Bank of Mexico information in links above): a $1,000 peso note dating back to the late 1970s/early 1980s is worth one Mexican peso today; lana, varos, plata, bolas, lucas, feria, billete, pachocha, billullos, villancicos, villanos, del águila, morlacos, papiros, Marmaja, Send a cheap Money Transfer to New Zealand, Get a MXN currency data API for my business. In 1993, after several years of inflation and devaluation, the Bank of Mexico changed its monetary policies and introduced a new currency called the Nuevo Peso (New Peso). Notes: The present-day value is given on this page of the bank’s web site. More info ►, Nicknames: lana, varos, plata, bolas, lucas, feria, billete, pachocha, billullos, villancicos, villanos, del águila, morlacos, papiros, Marmaja, Coins: Freq Used: $1, $2, $5, $10, 50Rarely Used: $20, $50, $100, 5, 10, 20, Banknotes: Freq Used: $20, $50, $100, $200, $500, $1000, Central Bank: It was an official legal tender in both USA (until 1857) and Canada (until 1854).