OSCAR News, is full of Amateur Satellite information and free to members. I was able to work several stations using the new ISS Voice Repeater this morning. When astronauts, cosmonauts and mission specialists from many nations fly on the international space station, they will have amateur, or ham, radio as a constant companion. Amateur Radio Frequencies (Note: Only one mode active at a time). United States and Russian teams have trained the astronauts and cosmonauts to operate the equipment. The blue sections of the ISS' track indicate when the … Schools, clubs, societies - space exploration and history. There is a link in the right hand menu. Thoughts? Radio Transmissions from the International Space Station. It is very sensitive and uses 5 watts of downlink power with a good antenna on the ISS. Here is the access information: The repeater uses the new InterOperable Radio System (IORS), a space-modified JVC Kenwood D710GA transceiver, and an ARISS developed power supply system. They also donate and build hardware as well as making sure safety and qualification tests are successfully completed so the equipment can fly. It will enable new, exciting capabilities for ham radio operators, students, and the general public. With patience and knowledge of when the Space Station is above your horizon, they can be picked up by a reasonable receiver and aerial combination. Thanks to some great work by the ARISS Team, a new Voice Repeater system is operating on the International Space Station! Uplink (your transmit freq) 145.990 tone 67.0hz Downlink (your receive freq) 437.800 The thing is, you will need to compensate for the Doppler effect. Location, southern Wisconsin. ISS FAN CLUB – for Fans of ISS and Space Exploration, Amateur Radio Frequencies (Note: Only one mode active at a time), FM VOICE for ITU Region 1: Europe-Middle East-Africa-North Asia, FM VOICE for ITU Region 2&3: North and South America-Caribbean-Greenland-Australia-South Asia. Privacy Policy and Important Notices, Amateur Radio International Space Station (ARISS), Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), Amateur Radio Stations Heard via the International Space Station, Space Walk to Help Astronauts Ham It Up in Comfort. They are seldom reported. The IORS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on March 6, 2020, on board the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. ARISS–Celebrating 20 years of continuous amateur radio operations on the ISS! This map shows the ground track of the International Space Station's next orbit. IORS in Columbus module, activated 2 September 2020: FM V/u with PL VOICE Repeater (Worldwide), AX.25 1200 Bd AFSK Packet Radio (Worldwide), 121.125 FM RS EVA from Orlan suit [Credit N5VHO], 121.75 FM Downlink from Soyuz-TM (voice). Often active over Moskow. The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) announcement reads: The ARISS team is pleased to announce that set up and installation of the first element of our next generation radio system was completed and amateur radio operations with it are now underway. Since its first flight in 1983, ham radio has flown on more than two-dozen space shuttle missions. The Russians have provided ports so that antennas can be mounted on the station's Zvezda Service Module -- the space station unit that provides living quarters for the astronauts and cosmonauts. The blue sections of the ISS' track indicate when the … The initial operation of the new radio system is in FM cross-band repeater mode using an uplink frequency of 145.99 MHz with an access tone of 67 Hz and a downlink frequency of 437.800 MHz. Donations to the ARISS program for next generation hardware developments, operations, education, and administration are welcome — please go to https://www.ariss.org/donate.html to contribute to these efforts. The first initial radio station was flown onboard the space shuttle Atlantis on STS-106. This first element, dubbed the InterOperable Radio System (IORS), was installed in the International Space Station Columbus module. As human space flight moves into a new uncharted era, an organization called ARISS, which stands for Amateur Radio on international space station, has been formed to design, build and operate equipment. Follow-on next generation radio system elements include an L-band repeater uplink capability, currently in development, and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed “ARISS-Pi,” that is just beginning the design phase. Since its first flight in 1983, ham radio has flown on more than two-dozen space shuttle missions. Educational Telemetry beacon is 300 mW during day and 30 mW at night. Passband may be up to 15 kHz higher depending on on-board temperatures I have tried October 15th and 16th. FM VOICE for ITU Region 1: Europe-Middle East-Africa-North Asia Downlink 145.800; Uplink 145.200; FM VOICE for ITU Region 2&3: North and South America-Caribbean-Greenland-Australia-South Asia Downlink 145.800; Uplink 144.490; IORS in Columbus module, activated 2 September 2020: