Lie on your back flat on the floor, with your arms extended straight over your head and the back of your hands resting on the floor. PhotoObjects.net/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images. Lie flat on your back with your legs out straight. Do not stretch so far that you experience pain or strain. The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. Start by kneeling, with your hands at your sides. Nall is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Tennessee. Stay in this stretch for 15 seconds, then slowly lift your pelvis up toward the ceiling. Obtain permission from your physician before beginning a stretching program to ensure you can stretch safely. This stretch targets the middle and deep muscles of your abdominals. Repeat the cat/cow position three times through. This twist is a variation on the half lord of the fishes yoga pose, and is particularly beneficial in stretching abdominal adhesions. Keep your feet together as you bring your knees to the floor. Joe King began writing fitness and nutrition articles in 2001 for the "Journal of Hyperplasia Research" and Champion Nutrition. King holds a Bachelor of Science in kinesiology from California State University, Hayward, and a Master of Science in exercise physiology from California State University, East Bay. Raise your chin up, and arch your back until you feel a stretch through your abdominals. Hold this position for 25 to 30 seconds and switch sides. Maintain your arms at shoulder level as you twist to your right, putting the left hand forward and right arm backward. Avoid letting your shoulders rise toward your earlobes. Rachel Nall began writing in 2003. Hold this extended position for 25 to 30 seconds. Hold this position for 15 seconds, then rest and alternate to your opposite side. To perform, place your legs on a wall and scoot your buttocks toward the wall to deepen the stretch. Use the exercise in conjunction with pelvic floor exercises and abdominal massage, to prevent further complications and reduce symptoms. If you experience abdominal adhesions, you can use physical therapy exercises to relieve symptoms and soften scar tissue. Copyright 2020 Leaf Group Ltd. / Leaf Group Media, All Rights Reserved. Repeat three to four times. Take deep breaths as you feel the stretch in your abdomen. Hold this position for 25 to 30 seconds. Bend one leg and cross it over the top of your other leg so that your foot is flat on the floor on the far side of your knee. Repeat on the opposite side. Tuck the chin as close to your chest as possible. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse Rest for a few deep breaths, then repeat 10 times. Place your right hand on the floor, and look over your right shoulder. Slowly press on the floor with your pelvis and hands to lift the torso upward. Stretching is one way to help break up scar tissue and realign it so that the collagen fibers and the muscle fibers are lined up in the same direction. If you experience abdominal adhesions, you can use physical therapy exercises to relieve symptoms and soften scar tissue. Stretches to Relieve the Pain of Piriformis Syndrome, How to Stretch the Diaphragm and Longitudinal Muscle, Are There Exercises to Elongate Your Stomach, "Essentials of Strength and Conditioning"; Thomas R. Baechle and Roger W. Earle; 2000, "Physiology of Sport and Exercise"; Jack H. Wilmore and David L. Costill; 2004. Release the stretch to lower the back, creating a reversed U shape with your back. any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Use your arms to push your torso up, and then unfold your legs. The cobra is a yoga pose that is very effective in stretching the abdominal wall. This stretch targets the external obliques, which are the muscles on either side of your abdominals that insert on the outer ridge of your pelvis. Repeat three to four times. Remain in this position for one to five minutes. This author has been verfied for credibility and expertise. Terms of Use And they’re common. Practice deep breathing techniques to treat abdominal adhesions. Your head should look forward. Mild or temporary adhesions can develop after engaging in repetitive exercises such as running, sit-ups, abdominal crunches or other forms of strength training. Scar tissue contains non-contractile cells made up of collagen. This scar tissue can be painful, causing you to experience cramping and even intestinal obstruction. Release the stretch to lower the back, creating a reversed U shape with your back. This yoga pose stretches both the abdomen and the pelvic muscles. The supported pelvic tilt helps to relieve abdominal adhesions in the pelvic cavity. By: Joe King, M.S. This stretch targets the middle and deep muscles of your abdominals. Lie on your back with your feet flat on the floor, and cross your arms over your abdomen, gently gripping the stomach and pulling your stomach muscles toward each other.